Monopoly – through the years


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With houses bought, railroads haggled and tears shed due to in-game bankruptcy, Monopoly has become of staple of most homes, and the first introduction to the property ladder for millions.

Launching in the UK some 80 years ago, those 22 property squares marked some of the cheapest and most valuable property spaces in London. But, with the cost of buying a home a constant discussion; how would the Monopoly board look in 2016?

As you pass go, that £200 may have once set you in good stead, but today it would be the beginning of a very long slog, to raise the cash for a piece of Monopoly property.

The cheapest was once Old Kent Road, coming in at £60 but to buy a property here would now set you back more than half a million (£523,230). Two quick trips around the board would have once raised enough to buy the most expensive plot of land, Mayfair at £400, but today it would take considerably more. Purchasing property here in 2016 would cost you over £3 million (£3,092,166).

Mayfair may be top of the board still, but its second in command, Park Lane, has dropped 12 places to number 14. This is a similar case for Fleet Street dropping from 10th to 20th place on the board. For others, their popularity has increased with Whitehall moving from 16th to 7th place and Vine Street going from 12th to 4th place.

The Board Revised

Interestingly, in today’s prices, some properties on the board would be placed higher in value, where as some have decreased.

Here’s what the modern day board would look like, based on the top 22 most affordable places in London; placing them into their deserved slots on the board.

Interestingly only two places on the original board appear in today’s revised version, Old Kent Road and Whitechapel Road, coming in second and fourth.

Moreover, the price of properties on the board range from a quarter of a million (Barking – £244,326) to just under £600,000 (Haringey – £552,888). The perfect amount to set up home with a ‘Help to Buy’ loan of up to £600,000. With Barratt London having developments in areas such as Greenwich, which fall under an average of £400,000, you could be closer to your London home than you first thought.

With the popularity of London continuing to increase, with up and coming areas popping up all the time, how could the Monopoly board change in the next 80 years?