New homes in Enfield


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Spotlight on Enfield

Located in the London-Stansted-Cambridge corridor with fast links to central London, Enfield attracts industry, business and developers alike. With one of the largest regeneration programmes underway, transport improvements will see a new station, which will provide more connectivity in an affordable borough.

Enfield‘s flagship regeneration project – Meridian Water
Over the next 20 years, the £6bn Meridian Water development in Edmonton will create over 6,700 jobs and 10,000 new homes – making it one of the UK’s biggest housing projects.[1] On a former industrial site, the beautiful waterfront development on the River Lea will feature a new school, community facilities, shops, restaurants, offices, workshops and artists studios.

To make the district more accessible for commuters, a brand new train station is being built here to replace the existing, under-used Angel Road station. When the new Meridian Water Overground station opens in 2019, journeys to Liverpool Street will take 24 minutes and to Stratford just 17 minutes.[2] Longer term, there are also plans for the new station to form part of the north-south Crossrail 2 route, which is scheduled to open around 2030.

Improving Ponders End
The council’s largest housing estate renewal scheme gets under way this year with the £150m redevelopment of the Alma Estate. Part of the wider regeneration of Ponders End, the project involves demolishing 717 council properties to build approximately 1,000 new homes, shops, restaurants, an affordable gym and community facilities.

The programme is the £46m redevelopment of Ponders End High Street. Named the Electric Quarter in honour of electric light bulb inventor Joseph Swan who lived here, the project will deliver 167 family homes – 30% of which will be affordable. There will also be new retail units, a new high-street home for the much-loved Ponders End Library, and a new network of cycle and pedestrian-friendly streets.[3]

Cycle Enfield – plans to create a ‘mini Holland’
In 2012, Enfield became one of three boroughs to win a £30m grant from the former Mayor of London to make its high streets more accessible by bike and on foot. As part of the scheme, Enfield town centre will have new segregated cycle routes linking key destinations around the town. There will also be cycle storage hubs at Enfield Town and Edmonton Green stations, and new greenway routes will be developed across the whole borough.[4]

A council-run energy company
Enfield Council has just given the green light to a £58m investment in a new energy firm. The project, due to complete by 2020, will supply energy to more than 15,000 homes and businesses across the borough, providing them with better value and a better service. ‘Energetik’ will develop, own and operate energy centres at Meridian Water, Arnos Grove, Ponders End and Oakwood, supplying customers with heat and hot water through their own network of highly insulated pipes.[5]

A well-connected borough
Ideal for commuters, the borough of Enfield has four stops on the Piccadilly line. Tube journeys to the City take less than 30 minutes and to central London around 45 minutes.Enfield town has direct rail links to Liverpool Street, Moorgate and Stratford stations. It’s 25 minutes from Enfield Town to Liverpool Street, 27 minutes from Enfield Chase to Moorgate, and from Enfield Lock to Stratford, it’s just 21 minutes.[6]

A vibrant economy
With easy access to airports and both the M25 and the A406 North Circular, Enfield has attracted a diverse commercial base. Home to nearly 12,000 businesses and features London’s second largest strategic industrial/distribution cluster.[7] Travis Perkins, Western Aerospace, TDK Semiconductor, Schweppes and Coca-Cola are some of the big-name companies based here. Sony, Tesco, BT and John Lewis are among those with distribution centres here, taking advantage of Enfield’s excellent location.

Current asking prices and rental yields
As of February 2017, the average value of properties in the London borough of Enfield is £455,765. It has increased 5.96% in the last 12 months and 47.46% in the last five years. For a two-bedroom apartment, the average asking price is £365,543 and the average asking rent is £1,364pcm, which means the gross rental yield is currently 4.50%.[8]

This content is correct as of February 2017